Basic Node-Red Flows for Automating Lighting with Home Assistant

Smart light bulbs are probably the first thing everyone getting into home automation buys. It is easy to see the applications for them – have the lights come on at night, turn off when you’re home, etc. It’s very satisfying to have the lights react to the day and your activities, and my goal with automating lighting has always been to not have to think about it, for it to work in the background.

In my initial post about Home Assistant and Node-Red, I explained the initial hoops you have to jump through to get both pieces of software up and running and talking to each other. Now we will start using them together in some very simple flows to control lighting, to get a better understanding of how Node-Red works, and to start to delve into this powerful tool.

Continue reading →

The Open Source Smart Home: Getting Started with Home Assistant & Node-Red

Home Assistant is one of the most interesting open source projects I’ve ever come across. It interfaces with any device, platform, or service you can think of and allows you to perform actions based on the data you monitor. It has a great community and is under extremely active development. With a little creativity almost anything is possible with Home Assistant, and best of all it’s private and totally under your control.

After using Hass to control my smart home for the last year, I started to hit the limitations of it’s YAML-based configuration. Any automation that was even moderately complicated  required a lot of pieces spread out through the configuration files (see the sprawling “Creating an Alarm Clock” thread on the HA forums for an example). Doing simple things like if-then or a  loop required awkward workarounds. As my automations (and ambitions) increased in complexity, so did the time I spent  trying to figure out what was going on.

That’s when I discovered Node-Red, a visual programming tool developed by IBM. Node-Red is the perfect complement to Home Assistant, allowing for very complicated logic to be constructed visually through a simple “flow” interface. It integrates seamlessly with Home Assistant. Let’s set it up.

Continue reading →